Why do I believe in The Graph? What drives and inspires me?

The Graph’s mission is to enable indexation level that is fully supported by public infrastructure.
Decentralizing the full stack will enable applications to be resilient to business disruption and rent seeking, and provide an unprecedented level of interoperability. Users and developers will know that the software they are investing time and money in cannot suddenly disappear.
To realize this vision of fully decentralized applications (dApps), it is critical to move from the paradigm of companies paying for persistent storage, computing, and other services needed to keep an application running, to users who pay directly to the networks of decentralized service providers for granular use of those resources.

Why is Graph so important to Web3?
Most “decentralized” applications today only accept this model at the bottom of the stack — the blockchain — where users pay for transactions that change the state of the application. The rest of the package is still run by centralized enterprises and is subject to random disruption and rent seeking.
To realize this vision of fully decentralized applications (dApps), it is critical to move from the paradigm of companies paying for persistent storage, computing, and other services needed to keep an application running, to users paying directly to the networks of decentralized service providers for granular use of those resources.
What subgraphs are most important to Web3 and why?
Subgraphs with the highest flow of requests. Those that aggregate data, and not just transfer it in a “raw” form.

What did I learn during the curatorial program?
I learned a lot from the curated program of identifying high quality subgraphs and designing my own.
Curators are subgraph developers, data consumers, or community members who signal to indexers which subgraphs (APIs) should be indexed by The Graph Network. Curators add GRT to the link curve to signal a specific subgraph and earn a portion of the request fee for the subgraphs they signal; stimulating data sources of the highest quality.
Curators use their knowledge of the Web3 ecosystem to assess which subgraphs are high quality — curators don’t need to be technical. For example, if you know which applications are used the most, which data sources are most trusted, and which communities are growing, you can determine which subplots will be of the highest quality!
Since curation occurs on a binding curve, the earlier consumers signal the subgraph, the more they can earn from it for a request. However, there is a risk that if others sell their curated shares, the share price could decline and the curator will receive less GRT from the peg. Curators cannot be cut for bad behavior, but curators are subject to a withdrawal tax that prevents them from making bad subgraph signaling decisions that could compromise network integrity. Curators also get lower request fees if they choose to curate a low quality subgraph because there will be fewer requests to process or fewer indexers to process those requests.

What gets me excited when curation starts on the mainnet?
Once the mainnet is launched, anyone will be able to participate in the network and contribute to the ecosystem. To support the user experience, The Graph Foundation partnered with Edge & Node to develop the Graph Explorer dApp and Gateway to support users who want to access subgraphs and curates on the web. Check out the additional information on Graph Explorer in 2021. Any third party can also develop tools and applications to access the Graph Network.